Album Review: Taylor Swift Lover

A few weeks ago I posted reviews of 1989 and reputation, Taylor Swift’s last two albums, in an attempt to get pumped for the release of Lover, her newest project, which I was apprehensive about. Revisiting those albums, and let’s be honest, the earlier ones as well, did the job. On release day I went early to Target and bought the album. Several copies of it in fact as I got swept up in all the excitement of the two other ladies there for the same reason, and the Target employees setting up the displays. It reminded me of how I felt with Taylor Swift’s other releases. Anticipating new music should be fun, and there’s nothing quite like listening to a new album all the way through for the first time. Some songs will catch you right away, others need a few plays to get into. So, I gave into that feeling, and now that I’ve had some time to digest the album, let’s get into my thoughts on Lover.

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“I Forgot That You Existed”
I’ve said it before, Taylor Swift knows how to pick an album opener. This is a laid back brush off to what is presumably a former boyfriend, though it could apply to any of her “haters.” It feels effortlessly nonchalant despite the fact that the point of the song, that she’s forgotten someone existed, is impossible to do while singing about how much she doesn’t think about them any more. It’s a light track that allows the listener to easily slip into what is to come over the next seventeen tracks.

“Cruel Summer”
A solid follow up to the previous song that keeps the low-key vibe going. With eighteen tracks, a majority of which are under the three and a half minute mark, it feels like there should be a sense of urgency in the first few, that they would have fast tempos and insistent lyrics. That’s not the case, and I like that Swift doesn’t seem to be in a rush at the start of the album. She seems to be floating around this cool, carefree state of mind, and it works really well. It’s as though she’s saying, don’t worry, just let the music wash over you, and I think the best reaction is to do just that.

“Lover”
I was not a fan of this when it was first released as a single, and it was one of the reasons I was apprehensive about the album. However, it has since grown on me. I think it is a charming song celebrating a well-established relationship. Swift has so many songs about the new feelings rush of a budding romance, and the inevitable crash and burn of failed ones that it’s nice to see something celebrating the consistent glow of a successful one. It’s also the most country sounding song on the album, which appeals to me.

“The Man”
This is the first song to feel off for me on the album. Here is my issue: Taylor Swift has been a successful singer, songwriter, and businesswoman for the last fifteen years. She hasn’t yet hit 30 and she’s a multi-millionaire and has won dozens of awards. So some of the lyrics snag a bit as inauthentic/whiny. Yes, she has to deal with things a normal person would never dream of. I can’t imagine what it is like to have every aspect of your life scrutinized by the public. On the other hand, she literally marketed this album with versions that include pages from her diaries (I know because I purchased some). She is inviting the public into some very private moments, and when you do that, people don’t always react the way you want them to. Though I think she often invites the media beast in as much as she complains about it, the song is catchy.

“The Archer”
Another one of the first round of singles that I wasn’t enthusiastic about. The lyrics are fine enough, though I don’t think they are quite as brilliant as some critics have been saying. The music leaves something to be desired, and as a result the song feels bland. It falls especially flat when considering that its place on the album (track five), and its melancholic feel puts it in direct comparison to “All Too Well” from her album Red, which is by far the superior song.

“I Think He Knows”
After a couple of lackluster songs, Swift swings back into the cool groove she set up early on with this upbeat track about that rush that comes with the start of a new relationship. It’s light and airy without being trite. This also sets the trend for the rest of the album, there are some fun, energized tracks followed by a few less enthusiastic ones and so on.

“Miss Americana & the Heartbreak Prince”
Supposedly this is Swift’s protest anthem, and I can see where people are drawing that conclusion from the lyrics. What I can appreciate about the song is that whatever that message is, it is subtle enough to pass by on the first couple of listens. This means that even those who oppose her can listen without feeling excluded. Plus, it won’t feel dated in a few years. All that said, the song is a little dystopian sounding but with a pretty catchy chorus.

“Paper Rings”
Now we get to my favorite song on the album. This is Lover’s “Stay Stay Stay” but with a pop rock twist. It sounds as though it could fit right in on the Josie and the Pussycats soundtrack. It has a very early 2000s girl pop power rock vibe, and the entire thing has a frantic energy that practically screams for you to immediately jump up and dance along. To quote Swift (at the end of “Stay Stay Stay”), “It’ so fun!”

“Cornelia Street”
Despite this being a ballad, I actually really like it. It’s a soft, vulnerable confession of insecurity and fear where Swift tells her “lover” just how badly she would be hurt if they ever broke up. She knows she would be so devastated that she wouldn’t be able to go back to the places they’ve been together. It is both that beautifully unguarded admission, and a wonderfully sweet tribute to the relationship that she admits this place is so meaningful to her.

“Death by a Thousand Cuts”
After a string of pretty solid tunes, we hit another snag. Again, the song isn’t terrible, it’s just a bit blah in comparison to the others. The lyrics are actually quite good, and poetic. It’s the music that lacks anything interesting to contribute, and since this is a musical album, and not a poetry book, the song falls flat. With an album this stuffed, there were bound to be some duds.

“London Boy”
This track has the opposite problem of the previous one. The lyrics aren’t really clever but the music is fun, and it has a singsong feel that works well. It could easily cross over into the annoying side of things but it hasn’t yet been around enough for that to happen so it ends up being cute rather than cloying.

“Soon You’ll Get Better”
Right when Swift gets you thinking she’s just making a light-hearted album of love songs, she gut-punches you with this track about her mother’s struggle with breast cancer. She collaborates with the Dixie Chicks to deliver a powerful, emotionally fueled song that anyone who has dealt with the severe sickness of a loved one can relate to immediately.

“False God”
This is the first forgettable song of the album. The other mediocre tracks have had at least one thing going for them, whether it was a particular line, or that the music was snappy. This track stays at the same monotone the entire time and doesn’t have anything interesting in terms of lyrics or music to offer up in exchange.

“You Need to Calm Down”
I do not like this song. I didn’t like it when it was first released as a single, and then the video was released and I liked it even less. As part of the album, I appreciate that it has a purpose in communicating Swift’s message but that doesn’t mean I’m not going to be skipping it on every replay. I have thoughts on the song but too many to hash out in a format like this. I’ll just say that I think it’s hypocritical and condescending without at least being catchy. I’m also not sure I could phrase it better than Emily Jashinsky over at The Federalist. If you’re interested in a more thorough analysis of the song and video, you should check out that article.

“Afterglow”
I think I like the chorus of this song, I just can’t quite tell because I don’t find any of the other verses interesting or memorable. I like the idea behind the song, that Swift is admitting to overreacting to something that happened in a relationship, and is owning up to it. Perhaps on further listens this will grow on me but for the time being it falls into the middling pile.

“Me!”
Nope, even in the context of the overall album, I still hate this song. Though it is nice that they removed the “Spelling is fun” line from the final album version. It was just so disappointing to hear this song after anticipating the first single off her new album, and knowing that Brendon Urie was on the track (I’m a huge Panic! at the Disco fan). I don’t think it’s original, catchy, or insightful in anyway, meaning it doesn’t make it fun to listen to, which is what I think she was going for.

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“It’s Nice to Have a Friend”
This may be the weirdest song from a Taylor Swift album, and I really like it. There’s something intriguing about the plucking effect of the music going along with Swift’s straight delivery of the lyrics. She also does this thing where she almost whispers the word “Friend” at the end of that line, as though she’s sharing a secret with the listener. It all adds up to a strangely creepy-yet-sweet vibe that oddly works.

“Daylight”
I feel like this is meant to leave more of an impact than it does. Then again, maybe it is supposed to be the fade away of the album. Swift has set up the rest of the album to feel less momentous and more laid back. This song kind of does that. She even says in it that she once thought love was “burnin’ red” but realizes now it is “golden.” Gold is a much milder color compared to red and would be more likely to be associated with good feelings and easy vibes. It isn’t bad but it also isn’t memorable and as a bookend to album, it leaves things wanting.

Lover as a whole is something of a mixed bag. It has some really strong tracks, and the theme is solidly reinforced throughout. It also has some of the worst Taylor Swift music of her seven albums, and over-a-decade long career. The second half isn’t nearly as strong as the first but it does have some creative twists that hit the mark. Overall, I like the album, and I would probably place it just above reputation, and 1989. It works as a pop album but it doesn’t quite reach the insights or emotional resonance of Red or Speak Now.

Album Review: Taylor Swift reputation

As mentioned in my review of 1989, Taylor Swift has a new album coming out this week. Back in 2017 I eagerly anticipated the release of reputation, pre-ordering multiple copies, and getting all excited for the news of her tour. This time around I find myself more disinterested in all the hubbub of the album’s release. Don’t get me wrong, I’ll still listen to it, and I may even buy it. I’m just not excited by the thought of it. To try and get myself pumped for new Taylor music, I decided super last minute to review her last two albums. I already have a review of Red (and sort of her earlier albums), and now that the 1989 review is up, it’s time to take a look at reputation.

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“…Ready for It?”
Taylor Swift definitely knows how to pick an opening track that boldly sets the tone for the rest of the album. This is a darker, heavier start than any of her previous albums. With this she is loudly declaring the introduction of “New Taylor.” It’s in your face but then the bridge hits and there is an echo of “Old Taylor,” soft and hopeful. I would like this song if only for the brilliance of such a line as “And he can be my jailer, Burton to this Taylor” but I actually think it is a good, solid start for the album. It can be a bit heavy on the electronic new wave sound but it has a pounding beat that works.

“End Game”
Ugh, such a strong start to the album and then it’s followed by this. When I mentioned in my 1989 review that “This Love” is my least favorite of her songs, that was because I had forgotten about this one. It has all the issues of the problematic 1989 tracks (lack of personality, uninteresting music, and generic lyrics), plus Ed Sheeran rapping. Every time I listen to the album I skip this one.

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“I Did Something Bad”
The first song in which Swift curses is a fun, self-indulgent romp. Swift excuses her “bad” behavior due to the “bad” behavior of her exes, claiming if she did something worth criticizing it’s only because the guys she was with did something wrong as well. If “…Ready for It?” was the intro to Swift’s new sound, this is an introduction to her new attitude of not giving a fuck. She’s going to do what she wants because it feels good, and in the process she might just create an unrestrained pulsing song about her exploits.

“Don’t Blame Me”
There is a a gospel quality to this, as though Swift is both praying for and confessing her sin of loving someone too strongly. Mixing in the love as a drug metaphor brings a heady, lazy feel to it that makes you want to lean back and let the music wash over you. The break from this haze comes when Swift sings, “If you walk away/I’d beg you on my knees to stay,” underlining the desperation of an addict about to lose their vice. The music and lyrics are paired perfectly, making this a solid addition the album.

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“Delicate”
All the bluster of the previous songs is stripped away here, and a softer, more timid version of Swift is revealed. She’s unsure of herself in this new relationship, and is constantly seeking reassurance and second guessing herself. It’s a quieter song after a series of loud, confident ones. The line “Echoes of your footsteps on the stairs” demonstrates this beautifully, as though she’s whispering for him to come back but she’s afraid of seeming too attached too soon, so she lets him walk away. This is a light, sweet song that feels like Swift pushing aside the curtain of her new persona to reveal to the listener that there’s still some semblance of her old self tucked away, just waiting for the right person to come along and breathe life back into her.

“Look What You Made Me Do”
Of course Swift can’t let us get too comfortable with the remnants of her past self. That’s not what this album is about, so she immediately follows the softer song with this, her first single off the album. A lot of people don’t like this song. I am not one of those people. I loved this from the first time I heard it. I thought it was sarcastic, over-the-top, and a full on spectacle. It’s not as catchy as some of her other singles but it has a persistent beat that works its way into your brain, and some of the lyrics are actually pretty clever.

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“So It Goes…”
The first fairly forgettable track on an otherwise, so far, solid album (minus “End Game”). There’s a sense of nonchalance to this song that unfortunately doesn’t achieve what it intends. Rather than feel like a carefree expression of longing and desire, the song itself feels like an aloof and indifferent cast off, forgotten seconds after it’s finished.

“Gorgeous”
This song walks a fine line between being cutesy, and annoying. Sometimes I find the drawn out singing of the title word in the chorus catchy and fun. Other times it feels too tongue-in-cheek. I’m also not quite sure how to feel about Swift’s not so subtle admission to being open to the idea of cheating (“And I got a boyfriend, he’s older than us/He’s in the club doing, I don’t know what”). Technically she hasn’t acted on that desire but she’s definitely flirting with it. On the one hand, at least she’s openly embracing that “bad girl” persona she has been pushing so hard. On the other, I’m not a fan of cheating in any sense, and don’t really like it in the media I consume. It seems odd too that she would have had a song explicitly admonishing someone doing the exact same thing (“Girl at Home”) just a few years ago, and now that she’s the one flirting it’s not such a bad thing. Oh, and the toddler recording of the title word at the beginning? That’s always annoying.

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“Getaway Car”
The best part of “Gorgeous” is that it ends and then we get “Getaway Car,” which is one of the strongest tracks on the album. Swift gets back to her storytelling roots here, only this time it isn’t a romantic tale of star-crossed love made right, it’s a cautionary tale of rebound love deception with vivid imagery. Throw in some bank heist metaphors and you’ve got a pulsating whirlwind of a song.

“King of My Heart”
Sadly after the surging energy of the previous track, we hit a downhill trend on the next few, both in terms of vitality and artistry. There is nothing inherently wrong with the song, it just isn’t very interesting or innovative. The sentiment is rather sweet but it’s lost in the lackluster melody of the music. Much like track seven, “King of My Heart” is an unimpressive addition to the reputation lineup.

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“Dancing with Our Hands Tied”
Continuing along the lines of the previous track, this one feels bland. I actually like the lyrics quite a bit. The comparison of the relationship to a couple dancing while restrained, as the world breaks into chaos around them is quite poetic. The music on the other hand feels uninspired and trite.

“Dress”
With this song, of course, a lot of focus has been on the fact that Taylor Swift is openly singing about sex, tossing aside her good girl, aw-shucks image in favor of a more mature one. However, I think it’s worth noting that Swift hides some incredibly romantic moments in what is her most sexual song to date. “Even in my worst times, you could see the best of me … Even in my worst light, you saw the truth of me.” Yes, this relationship is an “adult” one but it also is one that involves a lot of trust and openness. The song manages to be sensual and sincere at the same time.

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“This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things”
In true Swift fashion, she can’t let things sit in a particular moment too long. She follows up “Dress” with what is my favorite song off the album, and a complete sass fest. Turning an internet meme into an upbeat catchy tune is almost as brilliant as using a piece of “I’m Too Sexy” in the first single. This song is completely full of itself in the best way. It’s this album’s “Blank Space,” a parody takedown of something, or someone Swift has a beef with, and I love it.

“Call It What You Want”
If the previous song echoed one of her hits from 1989, this one echoes the closer from Red, “Begin Again.” The music is light, and the lyrics sweet without being saccharine as she describes the fresh start of a new relationship and the subject who doesn’t want to “save” her but will “run away” with her as she licks her wounds. It’s a nice way to segue into the slower finisher.

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“New Year’s Day”
As with the previous two tracks, the album’s closer is very much in the vein of one of her older songs, in this case the fan favorite “All Too Well” from Red. She uses the New Year’s holiday to paint a picture of the mundane tasks of the day after, and uses that to profess her devotion. Yes she wants to share the glamour and glitz of the party with her partner but more than that she wants to share in everyday routines with him. It’s a beautiful confession of love, and the song is a great tribute to that idea.

As much as Swift has changed as an artist over the years, her core strength lies in being able to turn her personal experiences into shared ones for her fans. Reputation doesn’t always succeed in achieving this but it is an interesting experiment that stretched her musical muscles. Overall I enjoyed it. There are a handful of songs I’m not fond of but there are more that I consistently replay, placing it slightly above 1989 in my book.

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Album Review: Taylor Swift 1989

Taylor Swift has a new album coming out this week and I have mixed feelings on it. I haven’t liked any of the songs she has released so far. In fact, to me, they range from simply dull to downright offense. As such, I have yet to decide if I will actually be purchasing the album. I am a converted T. Swift fan from several years ago (in fact, I have a whole post just about that), and I’ve been fairly loyal since. I haven’t always agreed with her philosophical sentiments but I’ve been able to enjoy her music because it’s catchy and clever. From what has been released of the new album so far, I’m afraid to say it looks like those things are missing. Only once the album is out and I can hear it in all its glory will I be able to know if my suspicions are confirmed. In the meantime, I thought I’d do a couple of reviews of her earlier albums. I have one of Red from back when it was released, and in that I briefly review her previous three albums. I never got around to reviewing 1989 or reputation so I thought I’d get to that now. Here’s what I thought of 1989.

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“Welcome to New York”
The opening track is a big, sweeping introduction to the album, and a love song of a different sort. Swift is singing about her adoration of a new city and the excitement that comes along with discovering all a new home town has to offer. There is a hopefulness infused into the lyrics and music that digs into your bones and makes you want to pump your fist to the beat. This is a solid opener, and a great way to start off her first pop album.

“Blank Space”
Taylor gets cheeky in this parody pop ditty aimed at poking fun at herself and the media’s coverage of her love life. Despite it being a parody, Swift still has the sense to pepper in some poetic lyrics. You get lines such as, “So it’s gonna be forever/Or it’s gonna go down in flames/You can tell me when it’s over/If the high was worth the pain” and “Cherry lips, crystal skies/I could show you incredible things/Stolen kisses, pretty lies.” Even though this is a takedown of her public image, there is still a romanticized view represented throughout. In using the very thing she has been criticized for (too much love and romantic imagery) to mock her critics, she ends up making what could have been a silly joke song so much deeper. Oh, and it’s catchy too.

“Style”
This is the first sign that Swift may have made a misstep with this album. The opening section is weak both lyrically and musically, though the chorus is catchy. Unfortunately the chorus is the only solid section of the song as we return to the same lackluster emotion of the intro with the second verse. “Style” is not a terrible song, it just isn’t very inspiring or memorable.

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“Out of the Woods”
Speaking of unmemorable songs, we have the next track on the album. Again, I don’t think this is a bad song per se, I just don’t think the music is very moving or noteworthy. The lyrics paint a nice picture of a budding romance, and the fragility of new love but the emotion doesn’t hit as hard as it should. There seems to be a disconnect between some of the music on this album and the lyrics, demonstrated perfectly in this track. This could be a result of Swift’s new tendency to collaborate with other musicians. Sometimes that work can turn out some amazing music but Swift has always had a very personal connection to her music and when you start adding other contributors you start to lose that personalization. I think “Out of the Woods” is a casualty of this trend.

“All You Had to Do Was Stay”
One of the most forgettable and disappointing tracks on the album, “All You Had to Do Was Stay” is simply put, bland. All of the personal details usually present in Swift’s songs are missing here, and the listener is left with a generic tune about a generic relationship. Perhaps it is meant to be broadly appealing but it falls flat. Swift is an expert at making her uniquely personal experiences connect with a wide audience. She does this by filling her songs with emotion, the kind you get when someone is telling you something deeply meaningful to them. This song loses all of that without gaining any of the benefits of a broad swung song because in addition to being impersonal, it also isn’t melodic or snappy.

“Shake It Off”
The first single off the album, and Swift’s announcement that this will be her entrance into full-on pop only music is actually a really fun song. A kissoff to her haters and critics, it is infectious and upbeat, and nearly impossible to resist bobbing along to. Yes, it is pure fluff but it is so dang catchy it doesn’t need to be poetic or insightful.

“I Wish You Would”
After a brief reprieve from mediocrity, we jump back into the bland pool with the seventh track on the album. Yet again, this isn’t an annoying or terrible song, though it’s repetitiveness can get a bit irksome. It runs into the same issue as “All You Had to Do Was Stay” in that it’s emotionless and insipid.

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“Bad Blood”
This is not a good song but it does have a catchy hook, which makes it an interesting addition to the album. Again, there is nothing personal about the song, the lyrics aren’t clever, and this time run along the lines of being clichéd. The difference here is that the music is dramatic and big, making up (slightly) for the poor lyrical quality of the song. The addition of the Kendrick Lamar rap on the video version does nothing to improve the song.

“Wildest Dreams”
Finally we get back to what was working at the beginning of the album. Though short on details, the lyrics of the song describe a doomed-from-the-start romance. Swift keeps an airy vibe to the music, which adds a sense of whimsy to the described imagery. Everything about the song is like cotton candy. It’s sugary, yet light and wispy and not overwhelming. It’s easily digestible but doesn’t leave you feeling too sickly sweet.

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“How You Get the Girl”
This song is dripping with a cloying singsong quality that just grates the nerves. It lacks any personality, choosing yet again to rely on generic lyrics with a middling melody. Upon my re-listen of the album I found I had completely forgotten about this song.

“This Love”
Sadly, I had not forgotten this song. Until recently this was my least favorite of Swift’s songs. I feel a bit like a broken record saying that it sounds bland, and lackluster, though it does. It feels as though she was aiming for a high note of emotionally charged moments with this but misses entirely. The lyrics aren’t clever and the music is monotone. Her voice barely wavers above the one level it starts at, making this perhaps the most boring-to-listen-to song on the album. What is most disappointing is that this is the only track Swift has sole credit on.

“I Know Places”
Swift gets clever with her metaphors here, painting herself and her romantic partner as foxes trying to outrun the hunters. Obviously being hounded by paparazzi is not something average people can relate to but she turns this trial into a story for the listener rather than a diary entry. The song is clever, with a good hook and pulsing beat, making it a bit of a break from the previous monotonous tracks.

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“Clean”
With the final track on the album Swift brings together what she was desperately trying to do on “This Love.” This song is brimming with emotion, and Swift and Imogen Heap wonderfully pair haunting lyrics with wistfully hopeful music. This is one of those examples of her collaborating that results in something beautiful.

 

BONUS TRACKS

“Wonderland”
It is pretty easy to see why this track didn’t make the official cut for the album. It tries a little to hard to make the Alice in Wonderland theme stick and ends up feeling clunky and immature rather than smart and insightful. It does have a fun beat though, so the music saves it a little from being a complete dud.

“You Are in Love”
I’m beginning to think maybe I just don’t like ballads, except that “All Too Well” is my favorite Swift song of all time, and it happens to be a ballad. I think I just don’t like songs with no inflection musically or emotionally throughout, which is how I would categorize this one. It’s flat, and dreary despite being about a successfully growing relationship. It should be a happy time and the song is entirely joyless.

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“New Romantics”
Perhaps the one bonus track that could have made the album’s final cut, “New Romantics” is a pop power anthem for millennial women everywhere. Here Swift showcases her ability to take her personal experiences and translate them into a song that appeals to women her age going through perhaps not the same things career wise but definitely the same emotional trials. It’s a way for her to show that despite the financial, and notoriety differences between her and her audience, she gets what it’s like to be 20 something in this day and age. See, she really is just like us.

Overall I would classify the album as mediocre. There are some pretty solid hits off of it, and despite not every song working, generally the lyric work is clever. It is definitely the weakest creatively of her work (so far) but there are some things worth the listen so I wouldn’t discredit it completely. Of her six albums to date, it is the one I return to least often for a refresher lsiten.

Taylor Swift Red Tour: Los Angeles, CA August 19th and 20th (Repost)

Reposting some older pieces from my other blog.

My last post was a review of Taylor Swift’s most recent album and a confession of my new found love of her. This new semi-obsession would explain my latest fascination with all things red (lipstick, shoes, etc.), retro styles (50s inspired fashion) and black and white polka dots. I say “semi-obsession” because, while I have been listening to her music in increased levels and purchasing Taylor infused merchandise, I’m not to the point of wanting to tattoo her lyrics on my skin or showing up to a concert in full costume. “Semi-obsession” also covers purchasing tickets to her concert (twice). Here’s where I lose some credibility on my former claim.

I went to the first two concerts of her LA shows. They were back-to-back on Monday and Tuesday night. I could make excuses (we got tickets in November for the first show and I got tickets later because another friend of mine wanted to go) but the truth is I saw her perform live two nights in a row and I’m not embarrassed to admit it (okay, maybe I’m a little ashamed but not enough to let it bother me). I sacrificed sleep and a little dignity in order to do this but it was so worth it.

Setlist for Night #1:

State of Grace
Holy Ground
Red
You Belong With Me
The Lucky One
Mean
22
Ours
Everything Has Changed
Begin Again
Sparks Fly
Want U Back (Cher Lloyd)
I Knew You Were Trouble
All Too Well
Love Story
Brave (Sara Bareilles)
Treacherous
We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together

We (my cousin and I) purchased the VIP package for the first night (I know, losing credibility on “semi-obsession” claim) and that includes a “gift bag” which we got the week before (pictured below). In it was a “Red” blanket, some guitar picks, a light up baton, iPhone case (which I can’t use but is still awesome), phone sound amplifier, some bracelets, some greeting cards, a tote bag, and programs for each of her tours (Fearless, Speak Now and Red). The VIP package also included a signed cd which we received when we checked in, as well as access to the VIP lounge where they provided food and beverages (non-alcoholic) for us. Oh, and tickets for seats in the first 10 rows (we were in Row 9). The only drawback was that the tickets were will call only and my parents had to go down to LA Live (in Monday night traffic, ugh) because we used their credit card to purchase them (my parents must really love me). Despite this, I would say that the VIP package was very worth the price we paid.

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Swift opened with “State of Grace” and stuck mostly to other hits off of the Red Album (makes sense). She threw in a couple hits off of Fearless and Speak Now but nothing from her first album. Each number out spectacled the previous one. There were fireworks, strobe lights, and she even flew over the crowd at one point. She started off on the main stage, then during “22” she moved through the crowd to a small stage near the back of the stadium to perform a short set. While this sucked for the people in the front rows (namely us) I do have to say that this was one of my favorite things about the night. For one, it gave me an excuse to sit down for a few minutes and watch one of the four massive screens broadcasting the performance (oh my god, I’m so old!). Second, I think it’s awesome that she does this to reach out to her fans who paid for (or could only afford) the cheap seats. She doesn’t just pander to the ones who shelled out the big bucks but really tries to reach every corner of the crowd. After this short set, she gets in a lift that flies her over the audience, back to the main stage (while singing “Sparks Fly”) and finishes off the show.

She consistently has had guest performers during her shows and she did not disappoint this night. She had not one but two artist that stopped by to play their latest hits! First up was Cher Lloyd, whom I didn’t recognize by name but once they started singing “Want U Back” I instantly recognized her. The second guest was Sara Bareilles singing “Brave” which I screamed at the top of my lungs because I love her!

All in all, it was a great show. She is a certified entertainer and although there were no encores (my only real complaint) I had an excellent time and was extremely excited knowing that I got to experience it all again the next night.

Favorite Song of the Night: “Holy Ground.” The fast-paced dancing song was the second played and set the level of adrenaline needed for the rest of the night. The highlight was when drummers dropped from the ceiling and she joined them in a drum break.

Setlist for Night #2:

State of Grace
Holy Ground
Red
You Belong With Me
The Lucky One
Mean
22
Fifteen
Everything Has Changed
Begin Again
Sparks Fly
Closer (Tegan and Sara)
I Knew You Were Trouble
All Too Well
Love Story
Treacherous
We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together

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The only real criticism I can make about Night #2 is that the show is such a planned performance that there wasn’t much variety in the lineup (“Fifteen” instead of “Ours” and a different guest instead of Cher Lloyd and Sara Bareilles). That is hardly a real complaint though. Knowing what to expect did take a little of the magic out of the experience but I actually found that I could enjoy the music a little more the second night because I knew what was coming. The guest performers were Tegan and Sara, who played their single “Closer.” I hadn’t heard it before but they sounded good and there was an excited vibe in the stadium during the song.

Our seats were not the best. We sat on the side of the stage and had a limited view (something we were warned about when we purchased the tickets) so we couldn’t actually see the backdrop for the stage, or any of the four massive screens projecting the concert. However, we did get to see a little of the backstage action (a few costume changes and a sneak peek at her before the rest of the audience sees her).

I think my favorite part of the night was watching my friend Hannah go crazy. She is a huge Taylor Swift fan and the reason we went the second time. Her excitement was worth the cost of the tickets.

Favorite Song of the Night: “All Too Well.” This is my favorite from the album and what I personally think is her best piece of work. It was also the one performance where we didn’t get to see her at all because she played it on piano behind a piece of the stage blocking our view. However, hearing it live and letting myself get lost in the lyrics was an entirely emotional experience.

I would highly recommend seeing her live to anyone who is a fan. She is a veteran performer by now and knows how to put on a good show. Her songs are just as catchy live as they are on the radio. The differences is that live, you get to dance along and sing at the top of your lungs without attracting strange looks.

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Taylor Swift or: How I Learned to Stop Hating and Love the Country/Pop Princess (Repost)

Reposting some older pieces from my other blog.

A few years ago I wrote a blog on Katy Perry and how she had finally converted me. I now can say the same of Taylor Swift. She receives plenty of critical acclaim from her peers, it’s on the blog scene where most of her haters thrive, and I admit that I used to be one of them. I resisted Swift for the longest time, and even made fun of her in the aforementioned blog. It was never that I thought she wasn’t good as an artist, I just didn’t agree with her general life philosophy or sappy romance stories. I still don’t agree with a lot of what her songs are about but now I can appreciate that they are catching and infectious. In a lot of ways I’m blown away by her songwriting abilities. I truly think that she is one of the greats.

In honor of her tour starting, I thought I’d write a blog about Taylor Swift’s latest album, Red.

Let me first start off with a brief summary of her previous three albums:

Taylor Swift (Self-Titled) (2006)

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The album chronicles the day-to-day emotions and dreams of a teenaged Swift. While the sentiments in most of the songs are a bit immature and naive, there is also something rather magical about viewing the world through this young girl’s eyes. Thus far she had been largely untainted by love’s cruel reproach and major criticism. She was simply a girl looking for love and acceptance. Sweetness reaches its peak with “Mary’s Song (Oh My, My, My),” which tells the story of an older couple Swift knew that grew up together and fell in love (the stuff of girlish daydreams). The rest of the album consists of mostly break-up songs (the subject that now defines Swift’s career), a couple songs about relationships when they were going well and a general song about feeling like an outsider. All-in-all, it’s tone is sweet and it stands as the perfect representation of what most high school girls (which Swift was at the time) think about on a daily basis – boys, love and a fairytale ending.

Fearless (2008)

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This is when Swift’s super stardom began to emerge. Most of the songs on the album are about failed relationships, and while well written, they still don’t express much of a reflection on what love truly is and what these relationships truly meant, other than “he broke my heart, again.” The ones about budding love are idealistic and a bit superficial and, while the breakup songs are more angry, they are the still fresh, raw angry that comes after you’ve been dumped over a text message, not a well-thought reaction to realizing that you were being manipulated in the relationship.

There is one song I want to discuss briefly, “Fifteen.” I think this is one of the best examples of Swift’s philosophy on life, and how it changed from her first to second album. It still addresses her high school self but there are two key lyrics that demonstrate emotional growth – “Back then I swore I was gonna marry him someday/But I realized some bigger dreams of mine” and “I didn’t know who I was supposed to be at fifteen.” The first acknowledges Swift’s own philosophy on love and how she has matured from believing in fairytale endings, to realizing that love doesn’t have to be everything, or rather, everything doesn’t have to be about love. She’s realized a dream come true at a very young age. She gets to be a rock star and play music in front of thousands of screaming fans. She has more priorities now than just finding the right guy, although she’s still looking. The second lyric demonstrates another big growth from her first to second album. She now realizes that she didn’t really know who she was then, and maybe still doesn’t now. Life is a process and you have to be open to change, as much as we may not like it sometimes.

Fearless as an album still suffers from a young viewpoint but it makes sense, she was only 18 when it came out. The songs are still impeccably written and catchy. The overall tone is one of someone slightly exposed to real life and pain, who still holds onto the dream of hope and happiness.

Speak Now (2010)

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With her third album Swift reached perfection. This is by far my favorite of her records, including her most recent. I think the overall message and tone of it is the most cohesive and inspiring. It’s very clear from some of the songs that she has experienced true pain and humiliation, as well as recognizing that some of the blame for failed relationships rests upon her. It is also clear that while she has finally been exposed to some of life’s uglier sides, she still dreams big and has hope that someday things will all work out.

I will mention two songs specifically. The first is “Never Grow Up.” I love this one because it is a letter to herself, reminding her to enjoy the simpler things in life and to not grow up too fast. I think this is evidence that she has gone through some serious emotional experiences. She grew up faster than she wanted/expected and lost much of the innocence that she had during her prior two albums. Of course we must grow up and learn to become responsible adults (although some never do) but I think her message here is to not let go of every bit of the child in yourself. Hold on to some of that innocence and wonder. It’s what makes life so enjoyable when you have to deal with the struggles of adulthood.

The second song I want to mention is “Innocent.” This is rumored to be her forgiving song to Kanye West. I love that she takes a higher road and basically says, “Yeah, we all screw up, and what you did hurt me but I forgive you.” I also think it’s an example of some of her best songwriting. I love this lyric – “Wasn’t it beautiful runnin’ wild ’til you fell asleep/Before the monsters caught up to you?” In this one thought she expresses a melancholy nostalgia for innocence and youth and then contrasts it with the harsh reality that life hardly ever works out the way you expect. It’s such a beautiful song written about such an ugly moment.

Every song on Speak Now has a similar tone of wonderment that ties it into an overall theme. Even the songs that are heartbreaking still sound as though her heart is breaking because she had to leave this fairytale world and not because she was in a destructive relationship that left her scarred and broken. In my opinion it’s her most well-rounded album, both in terms of having songs covering multiple subjects, as well as showing growth as an artist. In one record she went from a high school, starry-eyed girl to a successful, strong-willed woman. I think it says even more about her talent that she wrote all the songs on her own.

Red (2012)

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1. State Of Grace
The album starts off with this rock/pop semi ballad about falling in love (big surprise there) after kind of drifting through life and just going through the motions of the everyday (“all we know is touch and go”). It sets the stage for the rest of the album with its upbeat yet rather mellow rhythm. There’s almost a laziness to it that draws you into a relaxed mood and opens you up to the idea of meeting someone, having an instant connection and falling in love with them quickly and intensely (“you come around and the armor falls/pierce the room like a cannonball/now all we know is don’t let go”). It’s a pretty standard subject material and sound for her but at the same time something about it just seems more adult.

2. Red
The title track. This exemplifies the major theme of the album- “red love.” Swift explains what she believes this to be in the CD jacket. I love that she gives a little note to the fans about each album. It helps her explain where she was coming from when writing it and it adds a personal touch that I’m sure all of her fans appreciate. In her view, loving in shades of red means loving in different shades of intensity. This could be great passion, anger, jealousy or even deep depression, which this song experiences all of (“Losing him was blue like I’d never known/Missing him was dark grey all alone/Forgetting him was like trying to know somebody you never met/But loving him was red/Oh, red/Burning red”). It too is pretty standard Swift material, which means it’s a love/breakup song that is so catchy it will get even the most cynical Swift haters singing along.

3. Treacherous
This is probably my favorite song on the album (Track 5 comes pretty close too) and I think it’s an interesting change of pace for Swift. Up until now all of her songs have been very chaste in terms of sexuality. She always wrote about things from a very young, untainted girl’s perspective (first kisses and hand-holding kind of stuff). This is the first time that she hints at a physical relationship between her and the subject of the song (“And I’ll do anything you say/If you say it with your hands”). The line shows that Swift is stepping away from that innocent-starry-eyed vision of herself that has become so iconic. She is growing as an artist as well as a person. She’s bound to write about more mature material and even become bolder with the language she uses.

4. I Knew You Were Trouble
I really like this song because it’s the one on the album where she shows the most change in sound. She’s experimenting and succeeding with new approaches to the way she performs music. There is some pretty heavy dubstep happening that adds to the imagery of a toxic relationship coming apart at the seams (“Flew me to places I’d never been/Now I’m lying on the cold hard ground”). The song evokes the image of a relationship that was much more destructive than simply frustrating. It’s also more about the reflection after the relationship that suggests that she knew what she was getting into (hence the title). She’s taking on some of the blame for the fallout, declaring that she went headfirst into the relationship, knowing that it was a bad idea. The video for this song is really worth watching:

5. All Too Well
I mentioned earlier that this is one of my favorite songs on the album. What I like most about it is the essence of bittersweet emotion in it. Even if I don’t agree with Swift’s life philosophy of falling in love whenever possible, I do envy her ability to do so easily. She obviously fell deeply for whoever she wrote this song about and the backlash of doing so was that when the relationship ended, it hurt that much more (“And you call me up again just to break me like a promise/So casually cruel in the name of being honest”). First let me just say how great the phrase “casually cruel” is. With two words she has instantly related how the other person has treated the breakup, and how horrible it makes her feel to think that they don’t seem at all bothered by it. This reduces her to almost lifeless sorrow (“I’m a crumpled up piece of paper lying here”). To love so freely and hurt so deeply is something I’ve never been able to do or truly understand. I may not have any experience with a relationship like this but while listening to this song, I feel like I have because Swift is so good at relaying emotion and inviting others into her dreams, happiness and pain. Any good artist doesn’t hold back and she has demonstrated time and time again that she goes headfirst into any and everything she does.

6. 22
This song is really light and carefree and what I love about it is that it promotes the idea of hanging with friends and letting loose without the need for heavy drinking or partying. Not that either of those is necessarily bad (except for maybe the heavy drinking part) but I like that she has a song about leaning on your friends to get you through tough times. The only problem I have with it is that she bookends it with references to romance/guys (“It feels like a perfect night to dress up like hipsters/And make fun of our exes, ah ah, ah ah” … “You look like bad news/I gotta have you/I gotta have you”). While I recognize, and now appreciate, that’s what she is good at writing about, I was just disappointed that she couldn’t let it go for this one song. I could let the first line slip because that is what you do when you hang with friends – complain about past lovers and other stressful things. The last line though feels like a crutch. It’s almost like she got to the end and thought it needed to tie into the rest of the album so she had to add a thought about meeting the next big love in her life. Overall though, the song is about being young, confused, lonely and miserable but making it enjoyable by surrounding yourself with good friends and reminding yourself that it’s okay to enjoy the little things and have fun.

7. I Almost Do
This was the most forgettable song on the album for me. It wasn’t bad, there just wasn’t anything special about it. It is one of the slower songs on the album and I tend to immediately connect with the faster ones, whereas the slower ones need to grow on me. I don’t think that had much to do with it though. The lyrics aren’t inspiring and the idea is a little bland (“In my dreams you’re touching my face/And asking me if I want to try again with you/And I almost do”). Saucy. She’s thinking about an ex and almost calls him but then doesn’t. Okay. Exciting stuff there, Taylor. It’s still good at expressing a sad longing for this person but it just left me saying, “Eh,” (complete with shoulder shrug).

8. We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together
The one that started it all. This was the first single off the album and a good choice considering it demonstrates the drastic change in her sound pretty well. When I first heard it I didn’t really like it but the more I listened to it the more I began to appreciate just how damn catchy it is. We’ve all heard it about a hundred times by now but I still turn the volume up every time it comes on the radio. I think the fact that it’s written like a conversation is what is so interesting to me. She’s talked about how it came about after ranting to her friend when a friend of an ex told her they (she and the ex) were totally going to get back together. It really does feel as if you were sitting with a friend listening to them rant about an ex spreading rumors and being pathetic (“You go talk to your friends, talk to my friends, talk to me (talk to me)/But we are never ever ever ever getting back together”).

9. Stay Stay Stay
I have mixed feelings towards this song. It is really upbeat and infectious, which I like but at the same time it gets a little too sweet/sappy for my tastes (always a risk when I listen to any of her songs). It’s very cute and has an endearing message: work through your relationship problems and stay with the one you love (“And I love you because you have given me no choice but to/Stay, stay, stay”). Although I’m not sure Taylor is taking her own dating advice. She does have a pretty bad record when it comes to long-term relationships, or lack thereof. But who am I to judge?

10. The Last Time
I love that Swift has not one but two duets on this album. This one is with Gary Lightbody of Snow Patrol, who I love. They have such a sad, poetic sound which translates to this song. It tells the story of a couple who is obviously toxic to each other that keep coming back despite being hurt over and over (“Right before your eyes/I’m breaking, no past/No reasons why/Just you and me”). I like the idea that you could want someone so badly and feel such a strong connection to that you keep hurting yourself because you are drawn to them. It’s sadly romantic. Sometimes you can’t explain why but some people can have a power over you and you can’t help let them in your door even after they’ve left you wounded.

11. Holy Ground
I instantly knew that I loved this song. It is so fast and upbeat but has a very melancholy message. She’s reflecting on a past relationship and realizing that even though it’s over, they had a good thing going there for a while (“It was good never looking down/And right there where we stood was holy ground”). This is the first time that she has done this with a song, as far as I know. There are no angry words of revenge or hurt, it is simply, “that was good.” I’d hope that not every relationship would be remembered for all the terrible things that happened or sad things that will never be. Plus, it’s so freaking fun to dance to.

12. Sad Beautiful Tragic
I have to say that I didn’t much like this song when I first heard it. Then I looked up the lyrics and I realized how beautiful and tragic (get it?) some of them are. For example, “Good girls, hopeful they’ll be and lonely will wait.” What a depressing thought. Good girls will be good (pure) but suffer for it by being eternally lonely and stay pointlessly hopeful. So what then? We might as well all be sluts? Then there’s this line, “And you’ve got your demons, and, darling, they all look like me.” This guy dates girls who look similar (creepy) and they’re what haunts him. They may even be what keeps him from moving on. Can’t fight the drug if you keep using it, buddy. Lastly, there is this lyric, “Hang up, give up, for the life of us we can’t get back.” That’s pretty standard breakup stuff there. The relationship is dead and there is no way to revive it so let’s just call it quits (way to “stay, stay, stay” strong). Seriously though, I feel like this song goes so far in the opposite direction of mushy romance that it would be rock-hard depression if not for the fact that it oozes wistful sentimentality. But it’s still pretty to listen to.

13. The Lucky One
Some of my friends have speculated that this song is a letter Swift has written to her future self, or maybe it’s the other way around. Either way it seems to come from an experienced opinion. It tells the story of an artist that comes to LA, explodes in popularity and success overnight then crashes, or leaves right before crashing. Perhaps it’s Swift’s warning to herself to not get lost in all the glitz and glamor. It is the only song on the album that isn’t about love in some way (there is one small lyric about a lover but it’s passing and gets jumbled into all the other chaos going on) which is intriguing. It also has some interesting lyrics concerning fame (“And they tell you that you’re lucky/But you’re so confused/Cause you don’t feel pretty, you just feel used/And all the young things line up to take your place”). I have to admit I don’t feel much sympathy for Swift if she’s complaining about the price of fame. She’s rich and gets to do what she loves for a living. Yeah it sucks that her love life gets speculated on in every media form but she also writes about it. It’s bound to be discussed. She can’t have it both ways. That being said, I wouldn’t want that for my life so, a little sympathy is warranted. This song is still growing on me. I like the lyrics and tone but I’m not too hot on the music. It sounds a little too electronic.

14. Everything Has Changed
The second duet on this album. This time Ed Sheeran teams up with Taylor for a light, upbeat song about meeting someone new and the exciting rush of feelings that come after that first encounter. There’s not much to say about this song. It’s cute and endearing with lyrics such as “’Cause all I know is we said “Hello”/And your eyes look like coming home” and “And all my walls stood tall painted blue/And I’ll take them down, take them down and open up the door for you.” I don’t think it’s the best songwriting but it works well as a sweet duet.

15. Starlight
My least favorite song on the album. An ode to Ethel Kennedy, it reeks of sappiness and tries a little too hard for a sense of nostalgia it never achieves. I do think some of the ideas are endearing. For example she sings “You’ll spend your whole life singing the blues if you keep thinking that way … Don’t you see the starlight, starlight?/Don’t you dream impossible things?” I like that sentiment. Don’t worry so much and dream amazing things, it’ll make life more enjoyable. I think that’s something we should all strive for. I just don’t like that it’s given to me in an overly sweet-to-the-point-of-nauseating package. However, this doesn’t stop me from singing along at the top of my lungs whenever it comes on in my car. That’s what Taylor Swift does to you.

16. Begin Again
I think this song is the perfect track to end on. Over the course of the album we’ve gone on a roller coaster of emotions, ranging from jealous anger to deep depression. With this song comes a fresh start. It goes through the story of a first date that takes place after a pretty nasty breakup months before. There are references to an ex contrasted against the new suitor (“I’ve been spending the last eight months/Thinking all love ever does is break and burn and end/But on a Wednesday in a cafe I watched it begin again”). The message implies there is new hope that this next person might be the one. Despite all the emotional turmoil she has been through, and all the media surrounding who she dates, Taylor Swift is still that young girl seeking love and acceptance at heart. She has matured and so have her relationships but she holds onto that essence of herself.

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I think that’s what finally convinced me to be a Taylor Swift fan. With all that has surrounded her and still does, she stays true to what she believes in. I don’t feel the same way about love, nor am I obsessed with it the way she seems to be sometimes but I can fully support someone who is loyal to what makes them who they are. It doesn’t hurt that from what I’ve seen/heard she seems like a genuinely nice person.

The major complaints it seems people have about her are that she can’t sing, she writes about the same thing all the time, her views on love are archaic, and she has no real talent. In response to the first, I will say that while she doesn’t have the most amazing voice, she can sing, just watch any of her acoustic performances. I do think her voice sounds better when she just sits singing and playing guitar rather than when she is dancing around all over the stage but that’s not what people shell out the big bucks for. I may be in the minority here but if I’m paying good money for a concert, I want a show, not something I could receive the same enjoyment from as I could from listening to the CD at home.

As to writing about the same thing over and over again, I have complained about this before. However, I’ve come to realize that you do what you’re good at. So what if she only writes love songs? The Beatles catalog is made up of mostly love songs too. Plus, Swift does write about other things occasionally.

Her views on love are archaic. How do you respond to such an idiotic complaint? Everyone has their own view on what love is. Hers may be a little more traditional but why is that a bad thing?

She has no ounce of talent. Her 7 Grammy Awards say otherwise. So do her 11 AMAs, 6 CMT Music Awards, and 73 various other awards.

So what’s the point of all of this? The point is I’ve become a Taylor Swift fan despite my best efforts to avoid doing so. She’s worked her way in with her catchy songs and cute public persona. I may not be a romantic (I haven’t gone that far off the deep end) but I can at least listen to music about it without gagging or rolling my eyes too much. I even enjoy it. The point is I’ve never had to agree with someone’s opinions to enjoy and appreciate their good company and now the same can be said of good music.

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Albums (6-1)

I’m celebrating turning 30 at the end of the month by posting a bunch of my favorite things on this blog and my YouTube channel. Today I’m finishing the countdown of my favorite albums. If you missed my Favorite Movie Moments, click here for the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth posts. If you missed my first Favorite Albums post, click here.

 

 

#6 – Full Moon Fever

Tom Petty

Full Moon

I think I ended up stealing my dad’s tape of this album when I was little, and played it over and over in my walkman. I listened to it again recently and didn’t remember much beyond the hits but Tom Petty was definitely one of my favorite artists growing up, and still is. So glad I was able to see him several times in concert before he passed away.

Favorite Track:
“Free Fallin'” was the first song I ever identified as being my “favorite song.” I don’t know exactly how old I was when I first saw Petty in concert (had to be maybe nine or ten) but I do remember staying up long enough to hear “Free Fallin'” and then immediately after falling asleep.

 

 

#5 – Bringing Down the Horse

The Wallflowers

Horse

This was the first album I ever owned. I saw the music video for “One Headlight” on MTV and instantly developed a crush on Jacob Dylan. Then when we were on a family trip to San Francisco, and my dad was doing some Christmas shopping, he asked me before going into the music store if there was any band I liked. I said I liked The Wallflowers, and so he bought me my first cd. I’m quite proud of little ten year old me for having such impeccable taste.

Favorite Track:
Though “One Headlight” will always hold a special place in my heart for introducing me to the band, as I’ve gotten older, I’ve found myself more drawn to some of the B-tracks, like “Josephine.”

 

 

#4 – Speak Now

Taylor Swift

Speak

I mentioned in a previous post that I think Taylor Swift’s best songwriting shows up on her album Red but I think Speak Now is her most thematically cohesive, and it is my personal favorite. After burying my head in the sand for too long, I was shown the light and introduced to more of her music, particularlly this album. I loved the imagery depicted in her songs, and the fairytale life she was presenting through her music. The songwriting shows a little more maturity and demonstrates that its author has faced more of life’s disappointments. Despite all this, she still maintains a more whimsical view of the world. It’s kind of sweet to revisit the album now and see the world through the eyes of the unabashed dreamer she used to be.

Favorite Track:
“Better Than Revenge” is a song I don’t think I will ever hear Taylor Swift perform live. It’s her most unapologetic takedown of one of her “foes” and I love it for all the reasons she probably won’t ever revisit it. It’s harsh, and angry, and spiteful, and feels exactly like what you feel when you’ve been betrayed. It’s too politically incorrect for most listeners nowadays but man is it a fun revenge song to rock out to.

 

 

#3 – Talking is Hard

Walk the Moon

Talking

Walk the Moon was in the process of recording this album when I first discovered them. So this album feels more special to me because I got to see them before their big hit, and I got to experience their joy and excitement as they hit major success. Their latest album is much calmer in terms of mood, and that’s okay but I fell in love with this band because of their ridiculous high energy, and they delivered so much of that on this album.

Favorite Track:
One of the reasons I was so taken by Walk the Moon was because they played “Shut Up and Dance” at that Greek Theatre concert I mentioned in my last post, and they got the whole ampitheatre to get up and dance. As much as I love the finished recording, there is nothing quite like hearing that song live with hundreds of other fans singing along.

 

 

#2 – Death of a Bachelor

Panic! at the Disco

Death

It’s great to follow a band over the course of their career and see their different attempts at style changes and music shifts. It’s even better to see them succeed at these experimentations. Death of a Bachelor is the best Panic! at the Disco album to date. The sound of the songs is more self-assured and the lyrics are excellent. On top of that, the songs are also incredibly fun. It’s great to have music move you emotionally and speak to you on a deeper level but it’s also wonderful to want to dance to something energetic and fun. Death of a Bachelor loads itself with lots of upbeat, dance-worthy songs, and still gives some of those necessary emotional punches that you might be looking for.

Favorite Track:
“LA Devotee” is a love letter to the city of Los Angeles. Need I say more?

 

 

#1 – The Guest

Phantom Planet

Guest

This album is sixteen years old. As much as some of the other things on this list have made me feel older than I want to, this one makes me feel ancient, and it makes me feel the saddest. Phantom Planet was the first band I really discovered on my own and fell in love with. While some of the other bands on this list may have contributed to the soundtrack of my youth, Phantom Planet was the score I lived by. This band meant so much to me, and when they decided to no longer make music as “Phantom Planet,” it broke my heart. I had so many chances to see them perform live, and I will forever be grateful for being that lucky. I still love their music but now whenever I listen it’s sort of bittersweet knowing that they aren’t going to be releasing anything new together. Their music had a big impact on my life and I have enjoyed being their fan these last sixteen years.

Favorite Track:
I love all of these tracks so much but I’m going to have to go with the one that started it all. I first heard “California” on the radio one night when I was getting ready for bed. I was exhausted and about to turn it off when the song started playing. I was immediatley drawn in by that simple piano string at the begginning, and sat up in the dark, despite being ready to pass out, to hear the rest of the song. I bought the album soon after, and the rest, as they say, is history.

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Albums (12-7)

I’m celebrating turning 30 at the end of the month by posting a bunch of my favorite things on this blog and my YouTube channel. Today I’m continuing the countdown of my favorite albums. If you missed my Favorite Movie Moments, click here for the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth posts. If you missed my first Favorite Albums post, click here.

 

 

#12 – One of the Boys

Katy Perry

One of the Boys

I saw Katy Perry guest judge on American Idol in 2010 (before her current role on the show), and I thought she was hilarious and insightful, while still being critical when necessary (something she didn’t really do on this last season of Idol). It was at that point that a friend of mine mentioned really liking her music that I gave her first album a listen. I’ve been a fan ever since and have had the pleasure of seeing her live several times.

Favorite Track:
“One of the Boys” is still my favorite track on the album. I love that it is a celebration of femininity, and embracing different sides of yourself.

 

 

#11 – Red

Taylor Swift

red

It took a while for me to warm up to Taylor Swift as an artist. I didn’t buy into her life philosophy and her obsession with falling in love. Then I actually started listening to her music, and really paying attention to her lyrics. I was hooked by the time Red came out, and I thought so many of the songs on this album were well crafted and showed tremendous growth for her as a musician. I still think it has her best songwrtiting, though there are a couple of duds (“I Almost Do” and “Sad, Beautiful, Tragic,” I’m looking at you). Overall though, it’s one of my favorite albums, and it was my favorite show of hers that I’ve been to.

Favorite Track:
I mentioned I think Taylor Swift showcases her best songwriting on this album, and I think “All Too Well” is her best written song to date. It is also my favorite of hers. Her word play on it is clever, and she paints such a vivd picture that it feels like you’re right there with her, reliving the memory of this relationship.

 

 

#10 – Walk the Moon

Walk the Moon

WTM

Walk the Moon was a pleasant discovery courtesy of a Panic! at the Disco concert. They were the opening band for a show I saw at The Greek Theatre in Los Angeles. They had such high energy and their songs were so dang catchy that I just couldn’t resist jumping up and dancing along. I of course immediately went home and bought their album (after actually listening to it via my friend’s Spotify on the way home from the concert). I still can’t help but feel energized and want to get up and dance around whenever I listen to this album.

Favorite Track:
So even though most of the album is high energy, and I like it because of that, my actual favorite track on the album is “Fixin'” which is a little sadder but with a good hook.

 

 

#9 – Vices & Virtues

Panic! at the Disco

vices

Panic! at the Disco is another band I resisted for a long time. I think in high school I found their use of the exclamation point in their name pretentious, and then the removing of it for the second album even more so. Still, I was blown away by their songwriting on Pretty. Odd. and followed them more closely afterwards. When Vices & Virtues came out, it was as though they had combined the best parts of the first two albums into one. It wasn’t quite the frentic rock of the first album but it had more energy than the songs on the second. It found the perfect balance between the two styles, and it had an overall more hopeful sound, which I love.

Favorite Track:
“Ready to Go (Get Me Out of My Mind)” is such a bouncy, uplifting song, and it feels like something you need to play whenever you want to get pumped up for something.

 

 

#8 – Raise the Dead

Phantom Planet

dead

Phantom Planet’s last album is ten years old this year. That makes me feel really old. The concept behind the album was to base a lot of the themes and marketing on cult followings. I was happy to be a part of that cult. While it isn’t the lowest energy album, a lot of the lyrics on it deal with much darker themes, such as depression. It was a bit of a break from some of their more happy love songs but I think it felt more personal. I don’t know the story behind every song, and as obsessed as I was with the band, I don’t know what all was happening at the time. However, it feels almost as though they knew things were coming to an end, and decided to write something deeper. That connected with me very much, and not simply because they were my favorite band but because of all their albums, this is the one I felt I could relate to the most.

Favorite Track:
The title track felt like a last chance call for fans to embrace the music, and “raise” it from the dead, which is maybe where the band felt they were heading while recording. It also touches upon an idea of an inner demon type of conflict (perhaps depression, or loneliness), and again an attempt to overcome that conflict. It is dark while still being hopeful.

 

 

#7 – Teenage Dream

Katy Perry

Dream

After finally becoming a fan of her first album, I was a bit skeptical when Katy Perry started releasing singles from her follow up album. They sounded a lot more poppy and there didn’t seem to be a trace of that punk rock girl that I liked so much from One of the Boys. Then, of course I listened to the album and realized I was actually a fan of Pop music. Or at least I was a fan of Katy Perry’s style of Pop. I think this is her best album musically, and thematically. She is a bonafide Pop star but she still writes her own music, and dang if it ain’t catchy as hell. Again I was impressed with her ability to surprise me and show me that just because it’s something different than what I usually listen to doesn’t mean it isn’t good, or worthy of my attention.

Favorite Track:
As much fun as I have with “Peacock,” I’m going to have to go with “Califoria Gurls.” As a California girl myself, I can’t help but sing and dance along to this song. It’s so fun and carefree, exactly how Southern California feels sometimes.

 

 

Stop by tomorrow to see the last batch of my Favorite Albums.