Netflix Series Review: Mindhunter Season One

Now that the second season of Mindhunter is finally out, I thought it appropriate to finally get my review of the first season up. Slight spoilers for season one ahead.

Mindhunter follows the development of the FBI’s theories and practices around identifying criminal psychology and profiling. In the first season agents Holden Ford and Bill Tench team up with psychologist Wendy Carr to study imprisoned serial killers and apply the knowledge they gain to ongoing and future cases.

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It has taken me a long time to digest my thoughts and feelings on this show. I honestly can’t remember when I started watching it (I want to say March? Maybe February?), or when I actually finished the first season. What I did know immediately was that I really liked the show. I’m a David Fincher fan and there is so much of his style in the first season. As an executive producer, and director of several episodes (including the pilot and the finale), it makes sense that his artistry would be a big influence.

I think his touch is most noticeable in the way tension is built throughout the series. There is a deliberately slow pace to the episodes, and scenes are often drawn out uncomfortably long. Sometimes this was a little heavy handed, and took away from its intended effect by drawing attention to how long it was taking to setup a particular story element. Most of the time though it had just the right impact, making a character or scene feel creepier just by letting things sit in the moment.

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Of course, it helps when a director has a great cast to work with, and everyone on the first season of Mindhunter is outstanding. I have been a fan of Holt McCallany ever since his CSI: Miami days, which I watched religiously for a time. He has always been a strong supporting presence and it was great to see him get a chance to shine in a larger role. He is the perfect no nonsense, straight man to Jonathan Groff’s eagerly enthusiastic Agent Ford.

Groff, of course, is a standout for his portrayal of the younger agent. He is perfectly disaffected by the things they are hearing and learning in the interviews, and it isn’t until the end of the season, as he starts to have a panic attack at the realization that he has more in common with these killers than his coworkers, that he starts to worry about this emotional disengagement.

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Now forgive me but it took me incredibly too long to figure out that Anna Torv was not Cate Blanchett. Torv looks very much like the other actress and they both are incredibly talented so you can see why the confusion would occur. Torv as Wendy Carr is the clinical cog in this serial killer study machine. She, as an FBI outsider brings the scholarly aspect to the study. She may be just as emotionally removed from things as Agent Ford but that is because she comes from a scientific background. She also doesn’t interact with the interview subjects so I’m interested to see if that changes in season two, and if so how her attitude adjusts as a result.

A show about serial killers obviously needs some of them around, and the casting directors did an amazing job filling these roles. The most memorable of them being Cameron Britton as Ed Kemper (the co-ed killer). His Emmy nomination was well deserved. He is creepy the entire time.

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As for the structure of the show, it is essentially a procedural format. The agents go to a town, give their lecture, and help the locals investigate a crime while interviewing the closest serial killer. The monotony is broken up by personal dramas and the effort to get funding and support for the project at the FBI.

Mindhunter season one is a moody investigation of criminal behavior, how it was viewed four decades ago, and the actors involved in shifting that viewpoint towards what we know today. The world was changing in the late 1970s and suddenly there were new trends appearing in crime and people didn’t know how to react. The show does a great job of immersing its viewers in the world of 1977 and reveals what a scary place and time it was to be. Great performances, excellent writing, and near perfect direction give the episodes an ominous feeling throughout, building tension all season until the audience feels like they too are having a panic attack alongside Agent Ford at the end.

30 Favorite Fictional Characters

Reposting my #30DaysofFavorites project here on my blog. Sharing my 30 Favorite Fictional Characters.

 

 

 

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Movie Moments (6-1)

If you missed my explanation of this project, I’m turning 30 at the end of June. I thought it would be fun to celebrate by talking about my favorite things. In this case, my favorite Movie Moments. Today I finish counting down my favorite Movie Moments with my number 6 to my number 1.

 

#6 – Full Moon Transformation
Movie: An American Werewolf in London (1981)

This movie is almost 40 years old and still looks great. That’s largely due to the amazing special effects, which won the first ever Academy Award for Makeup. I am a fan of practical effects over computer graphics, and this scene demonstrates why real life effects work so much better than CG.

 

#5 – Pellet with the Poison
Movie: The Court Jester (1955)

Danny Kaye is a master of verbal and physical comedy and showcases both in this wonderful scene.

 

#4 – The trick is not minding.
Movie: Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

All of T.E. Lawrence’s quirkiness summed up in one scene, followed by that sweeping score from Maurice Jarre. Also, the best part of Prometheus.

 

#3 – Underwear Showdown.
Movie: Silverado (1985)

Paden is a sharp shot, and his horse is loyal. And he demonstrates this all in just his underwear.

 

#2 – It’s weird and pissed off.
Movie: The Thing (1982)

Another great example of practical effects and a disturbing sequence that kicks off the terror at this isolated camp.

 

#1 – USS Indianapolis Speech.
Movie: Jaws (1982)

It is a crime that Robert Shaw never won an Academy Award, and every time I watch this scene I feel like boycotting the show in protest.

 

Thanks for stopping by. I’m continuing my #30DaysofFavorites project with the next round on my YouTube channel in which I discuss my favorite movies starting tomorrow. Check it out here.

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Movie Moments (12-7)

If you missed my explanation of this project, I’m turning 30 at the end of June. I thought it would be fun to celebrate by talking about my favorite things. In this case, my favorite Movie Moments. Today I am continuing to count down my favorite movie moments with number 12 to 7.

 

#12 – Prologue
Movie: Beauty and the Beast (1991)

This is a beautiful opening sequence with the sweeping score and the stained glass animation. I always tear up at the last line, “For who could ever learn to love a Beast?”

 

#11 – Basement Scene
Movie: Zodiac (2007)

The entire time Graysmith is following this guy down into the basement you can’t help but scream at him to turn around and run out of there as fast as he can. Such a tense, creepy scene.

 

#10 – “Skin that smoke wagon.”
Movie: Tombstone (1993)

Wyatt Earp demonstrates just how bad ass he is by taking down the man holding a gun to him by lecturing him, and then slapping him of all things.

 

#9 – Strudel
Movie: Inglourious Basterds (2009)

Quentin Tarantino is so good at writing dialogue, and building tension within a scene without any outright action needed. All we need to know is Hans Landa is a master sadist as well as an excellent investigator, and sitting across from him is Shosanna, our hero in hiding. Add in some strudel and milk and you get this classic scene that makes me both incredibly uncomfortable and hungry for some pastry.

 

#8 – Hearing the song for the first time
Movie: That Thing You Do! (1996)

All the hope and excitement of the film is showcased perfectly in this scene. There are so many possibilities that lay ahead of them and they’re just enjoying the ride at this point. They’re kids hearing the fruits of their labor played over local radio, and it makes them feel like kings.

 

#7 – “They’re just gonna cut him all up.”
Movie: E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)

So I couldn’t actually find a clip for the part I was thinking of but here’s the moment right after.

Elliot demonstrates that he is wise beyond his years by telling Keys he knows exactly what will happen once the scientists take E.T. away. It breaks my heart every time I watch the movie, and I’m always impressed by Henry Thomas’s acting in this scene.

 

Make sure to come back tomorrow to see the end of my list.

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Movie Moments (18-13)

If you missed my explanation of this project, I’m turning 30 at the end of June. I thought it would be fun to celebrate by talking about my favorite things. In this case, my favorite Movie Moments. Today I am continuing to count down my favorite movie moments with number 18 to 13.

 

#18 – Ego’s flashback
Movie: Ratatouille (2007)

Only Pixar could create a scene in which a rat has cooked a meal so delicious that the world’s most cynical critic is instantly transported back to his childhood, and not make it seem trite. In this scene Pixar demonstrates how food can affect us by transporting us, and bringing to light memories enhanced by oursenses of taste and smell.

 

#17 – Raptors in the kitchen
Movie: Jurassic Park (1993)

Another infamous scene involving a kitchen, though with a much less warm and fuzzy feeling.

 

#16 – Drew eats it in the opening scene
Movie: Scream (1996)

In a move that is now legendary, and ripped off so much that the fourth in the series pokes fun at it, the star actress is killed off in the first five minutes.

 

#15 – Quid Pro Quo
Movie: The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

In one of the most tense scenes ever, you can’t help but hold your breath as Clarice offers up little bits of herself with the hope that in doing so Lector will help them catch Buffalo Bill.

 

#14 – The car chase
Movie: Bullitt (1968)

Ten minutes of pure adrenaline. Sadly it’s only available in bits and pieces on YouTube.

 

#13 – Samuel L. Jackson eats it, or rather gets eaten
Movie: Deep Blue Sea (1999)

One of the biggest surprise jumps ever. I remember being in the theater and jumping out of my seat with the rest of the crowd because no one expected the big name actor to get it.

 

Don’t forget to come back tomorrow to see the next batch.

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Movie Moments (24-19)

In case you don’t subscribe to my YouTube channel, and missed my explanation of this project, here is a brief recap. I’m turning 30 at the end of June. I thought it would be fun to celebrate this milestone by talking about a bunch of my favorite things over the course of the month. I’ve already finished one list of favorites (my favorite books), over on my YouTube channel, which you are welcome to check out by clicking on this link here.

Today I am continuing to count down my favorite movie moments with number 24 to 19. Also, please excuse some of the poor quality clips. I was restricted to what was available on YouTube.

#24 – “Pure Imagination”
Movie: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971)

Walking into Wonka’s factory for the first time is a magical experience, and grants the wish of every child for there to be a real life land made of candy. Also, Gene Wilder is wonderful.

 

#23 – Sam tells his story.
Movie: Sleepless in Seattle (1993)

Never fails to make me tear up.

 

#22 – “When Somebody Loved Me”
Movie: Toy Story 2 (1999)

This sequence will make you feel like a terrible person for throwing away your old toys.

 

#21 – Eduardo realizes he got screwed.
Movie: The Social Network (2010)

Andrew Garfield lets loose in this scene in a way I’ve seen few actors even attempt. All the frustration we have seen building within Eduardo reaches a boiling point, and is tipped over the edge when his “friend” screws him over after everything they’ve been through.

 

#20 – “I can’t beat it.”
Movie: Manchester By The Sea (2016)

After a heartbreaking revelation of Lee’s past, we see him break down even more as he admits to his nephew that he is incapable of moving past his guilt to take care of him in the way he knows he should.

 

#19 – “Come out sideways.”
Movie: Planes, Trains & Automobiles (1987)

Always gets a laugh from me, even when I’m not watching the movie but simply thinking about the scene.

Swing by tomorrow to see more of my favorite movie moments.

 

#30DaysofFavorites: Favorite Movie Moments (30-25)

In case you don’t subscribe to my YouTube channel, and missed my explanation of this project, here is a brief recap. I’m turning 30 at the end of June. I thought it would be fun to celebrate this milestone by talking about a bunch of my favorite things over the course of the month. I’ve already finished one list of favorites (my favorite books), over on my YouTube channel, which you are welcome to check out by clicking on this link here.

Today I am going to count down my favorite movie moments. I’ve been doing these lists in batches so, we’ll just focus on the first six, in order to give each one a moment of due attention.

#30 – The entire opening scene
Movie: It (2017)

The tension in this scene is so good, and I still have nightmares involving a really disturbing clown and sewers thanks to an amazing performance by Bill Skarsgård.

#29 – “I remember all of them.”
Movie: Captain America: Civil War (2016)

One line and you realize all those years Bucky has been used and brainwashed, some part of him, the real Bucky, has been awake the whole time. He not only knows of the terrible things he has done as the Winter Soldier but he remembers all those experiences, all those deaths, and he has to relive them, over and over again.

#28 – “You’ll Be A Dentist”
Movie: Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

Steve Martin’s slight Elvis impersonation is perfect for this sadistic dentist’s theme song.

#27 – “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You”
Movie: 10 Things I Hate About You (1999)

Every teenage girl in the 90s immediately swooned when Heath Ledger started singing Frankie Valli’s famous pop hit.

#26 – “Princesses On Parade”
Movie: The Swan Princess (1994)

We get a chorus number in the middle of an animated adventure story based on Swan Lake, and it is glorious.

#25 – Barn Building
Movie: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954)

A chance to show off the moves of their professional dance hires, this is one of the most joyous scenes in any movie musical.

Come back tomorrow to check out my number 24 to 19 favorite Movie Moments.